2022 Ford Bronco Raptor Is the 400-HP Desert Runner SUV of Our Fantasies

·3 min read
Photo credit: Ford
Photo credit: Ford

It's finally here. After years of rumors, spy shots, teasers, and videos, the Ford Bronco Raptor is finally official. With ridiculous looks, massive 37-inch tires, tons of chassis updates, and over 400 hp on tap, the high-performance Bronco of our fantasies sounds ready to tackle any terrain thrown at it.

One look at the Bronco Raptor and it's clear a lot has changed. Available in four-door guise only, the hood, grille, and all four quarter panels are Raptor-specific, with gigantic fender flares to fit the standard BFGoodrich K02 37-inch all-terrain tires. The body is an incredible 9.8 inches wider than a standard Bronco overall. There's a bunch of Raptor-only upgrades inside too, like paddle shifters mounted to the steering wheel, Ford Performance-designed seats, and a "Performance View" mode in the gauge cluster designed to highlight things like the tach and current gear.

Photo credit: Ford
Photo credit: Ford

But the biggest changes lie underneath the Bronco Raptor's skin. In the engine bay sits Ford's familiar 3.0-liter twin-turbo Ecoboost V-6, specifically tuned for this application. The company has yet to release specific horsepower and torque numbers, but says it's aiming to deliver over 400 hp once production starts. While that's great and all, the manual faithful among us will be saddened to hear the Bronco Raptor comes with just one choice of transmission: a 10-speed automatic. It sends power to all four wheels through an upgraded two-speed transfer case that connects to a new DANA 50 Heavy-Duty AdvanTEK live axle out back and a Dana 44 AdvanTEK differential up front. Aside from being able to handle more power, they also contribute to an 8.6-inch wider track width over the standard Bronco. Ford claims they're the same units found in its Ultra4-class Bronco race trucks, which is pretty neat.

Where the real engineering lies in the Bronco Raptor, though, is in the chassis and suspension. Bronco Raptor's frame has been revamped with beefier shock towers, a B pillar crossbar, and C pillar reinforcement to handle all of the bumps, jumps, and abuse expected from Raptor drivers. Those upgrades also mean a 50-percent increase in torsional rigidity versus the standard Bronco. There's a new Fox Racing-developed suspension Ford calls HOSS (High-performance Off-road Stability Suspension) that uses internal bypass semi-active dampers that measure 3.1 inches in diameter. The reservoirs are integrated into the shock body up front, but remotely mounted in the rear. They feature unique tuning front and back, and use sensors at each corner of the truck to monitor terrain conditions "hundreds of times every second," according to Ford, adjusting stiffness accordingly. Paired with Raptor-specific control arms, the suspension allows for 13 inches of travel in the front and 14 inches in the rear. That's 60 percent and 40 percent more travel versus the standard Bronco, respectively.

Photo credit: Ford
Photo credit: Ford

Being the apex predator of the Bronco lineup, the Bronco Raptor will come highly equipped as standard, with the SUV's famous seven-mode G.O.A.T. terrain management system, Black Onyx marine-grade vinyl seats, and rubberized washout flooring. The High package, which includes things like a 12-inch touchscreen, will also come standard. The Lux package, with its 10-speaker B&O audio system and adaptive cruise control, will be available as an option.

Pricing for the Bronco Raptor has yet to be revealed, but Ford says prospective buyers can begin placing orders in March 2022. The company warns that most of the 2022 model year allocations will go to people with existing Bronco reservations, however. So if you're not already in line, you're likely going to have to wait a long time to get a Bronco Raptor of your own, especially if you don't want to pay over sticker price.

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