The Last J Duesenberg Is Heading To Auction

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The name Duesenberg is quite possibly one of the greatest names in American automotive history.

While these cars will forever be remembered as one of the most extravagant American luxury cars of all time, a Duesenberg was really so much more. Far ahead of its time, Duesenberg’s innovations would not be implemented by Detroit automakers for decades and many of them are still used today.

At the top of the brands line of cars, the Model J was built to compete with such European cars as Mercedes-Benz and Rolls-Royce. It was based on a heavy ladder frame and featured the Duesenberg’s famous straight-8 cylinder engine mated to a 3-speed transmission. This iconic powertrain was reportedly able to push the incredibly long wheelbased car to speeds in excess of 100-mph. Coachwork was provided by numerous independent coachbuilders, but one of the most luxurious was built by Rollston.

Unfortunately, Duesenberg Motors was lost to the Great Depression and the last Model J featuring Rollston Coachwork was assembled in 1936. Chassis No. 2611 was then featured at the 1936 New York Auto Show as the most expensive car on display at $17K. It was later bought by then president of Coca-Cola, Conkey Whitehead. Later, it was purchased by Charles Kyner and the jazz musician kept it for 46 years. Richard Dicker of the Pennsylvania Railroad acquired the car from the estate of Kyner after he died and the car was restored in 1990.


This stunning 1936 Model J is now bound for Mecum’s Indy Auction where it is expected to sell for around $3.5-$4-million. As an award-winning Duesenberg with an extraordinary history, this car is truly a one of a kind collector’s car. Don’t miss this awesome opportunity to add one of the most luxurious American cars ever built to your collection.

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