The tech fallout from the Racing Point F1 verdict

Matt Somerfield
·4 mins read

The FIA’s extensive stewards statement outlined its arguments in detail, but it is clear that just as many questions as answers have been prompted by the outcome.

There is no denying it is a complicated matter. The main defence from Racing Point relates to the transition of brake ducts from non-listed to listed parts for 2020.

Its argument is that under the 2019 regulations it could purchase brake ducts and CAD drawings from Mercedes as non-listed parts, and in doing so be able to use that knowledge to assist in the design of it 2020 parts which would then be considered listed.

Racing Point RP20 front brake drum

Racing Point RP20 front brake drum<span class="copyright">Giorgio Piola</span>
Racing Point RP20 front brake drumGiorgio Piola

Giorgio Piola

Where the FIA’s decision is unclear is on why it has interpreted this year’s front brake ducts as a Racing Point design, owing to the development it did of its own during 2019.

If we look back at what it designed on its own last season, albeit with the guidance of the data made available to it by Mercedes, the designs used were only a facsimile of the original, with alterations clearly made to accommodate its own DNA. 

Crucially, a version of the front brake ducts being used this year never featured on the RP19. Yet the ones on the RP20 are as close to a replica of the brake ducts introduced by Mercedes in Japan last year as you’re going to find, suggesting there’s more Mercedes DNA coursing through them than Racing Point’s.

Mercedes AMG F1 W11 front drum
Mercedes AMG F1 W11 front drum
Racing Point RP20 front drum
Racing Point RP20 front drum


Always being just one development step behind the sport’s front runner is never going to be a bad thing for a team like Racing Point, which has always punched above its weight.

But, where it goes from here will be one of the most interesting aspects, as without the access to Mercedes data going forward, its design is inevitably going to be more disconnected.

In the images above we can see both 2020 designs, with Mercedes having taken the next step forward in order to deliver better heat management for the brakes and tyres, and aerodynamically, to assist the various flow structures that are built up around it.

Mercedes AMG F1 W10 rear brakes drum detail
Mercedes AMG F1 W10 rear brakes drum detail
Racing Point RP20 rear drum
Racing Point RP20 rear drum

Unable to capitalise on using Mercedes rear brake ducts last season due to its differing ride height philosophies and the aerodynamic impact it would have had on the likes of its diffuser, Racing Point used a design completely of its own making in 2019. However, for 2020 it decided to apply the same formula as it had at the front and alter the Mercedes design for which it had the CAD data. 

This is where the FIA consider that Racing Point accrued a sporting advantage over its competitors, with too much carry-over from the original design present. As listed parts are governed by the Sporting Regulations and the rear brake ducts are legal from a technical standpoint, the FIA has allowed Racing Point to continue to use them without penalty. 

This is far from the end of this matter

Other teams have been angered by the FIA’s stance, as the governing body has already admitted that in copying the Mercedes design Racing Point received an advantage in terms of being able to deploy resources elsewhere.

Allowing it to continue to use this design, even though Racing Point cannot unlearn what it already know, gives it an advantage that it will carry right throughout 2020 and 2021 and even into the design of the all-new car for 2022, as it will spend significantly less resources to chase performance compared to if it had stayed on it own development trajectory.

The more alarming part of this protest is that with Renault having only protested the brake ducts, there are still a multitude of parts that teams could still protest on this year's Racing Point.

The nose, for example, is another structural element of the car that not only requires a crash test but is also a listed part. Furthermore, it is almost identical to the W10’s design and is considerably different to the design used by Racing Point during 2019.

With the matter already heading to the FIA’s International Court of Appeal, this story is far from over.

Racing Point RP20 front wing
Racing Point RP20 front wing
Mercedes AMG F1 W10 front wing detail
Mercedes AMG F1 W10 front wing detail