How We'd Spec It: 2022 Toyota Tundra from Base to Nearly $60,000

·5 min read
Photo credit: Toyota
Photo credit: Toyota

The new 2022 Toyota Tundra has the truck world buzzing, as it's redesigned so infrequently that every new generation feels like a significant step forward. While there are still plenty of models still to come for the new third-generation truck such as the hybrid and the TRD Pro, Toyota has released the configurator tool for trucks powered by the standard twin-turbo 3.4-liter V-6 engine. Our editors chose from the various options for colors, bed sizes, cab configurations, and trims, and you'll notice that many of them centered on similar combinations of trim levels and packages.

Connor Hoffman's $58,862 Tundra Limited TRD Off-Road

If I bought a 2022 Tundra, I’d get a TRD Pro, but it’s not arriving until the spring, along with the other iForce MAX hybrid powertrains. I’m impatient, so I’d go for the next best thing: a Limited model with the TRD Off-Road package because this truck is hopefully going to live most of its life on the trails. I’d get it in the crew-cab configuration with a 5.5-foot bed and four-wheel drive. I love that you can now get my favorite Toyota color, Lunar Rock, previously a TRD Pro–specific color, on non–TRD Pro trucks. The TRD Off-Road package costs an extra $3085 and it adds things including 20-inch TRD wheels on all-terrain tires and Bilstein dampers—things I’d add anyway. Some other options I’d add are the all-weather floor liners ($169), console safe ($359), hard tonneau cover ($1295), rock rails ($270), and a black tailgate badge ($89) for a total of $58,862.

Austin Irwin's $41,075 Tundra SR

I wanted to see how weird the cheapest new Tundra with four-wheel drive would look. The base SR trim starts at $38,075 with destination, but keeping the final cost close to $40,000 requires sticking with the smaller DoubleCab and a 6.5-foot bed. The larger, more desirable CrewMax cab with a shorter 5.5-foot bed costs an extra $2050; although the DoubleCab with the longer 8.1-foot bed is only $330 extra, it makes the Tundra’s proportions look like a cabin with an attached bowling alley. I was willing to pay an extra $3000 for four-wheel drive, an obvious must-have in Michigan, even if it drops the max towing capacity by almost a half-ton to 11,200 pounds. For no extra cost, I chose Midnight Black Metallic because it’s the only color offered at that trim level to separate you from the delivery truck at O'Reilly Auto Parts. I also found that the $430 SR Tow package that’s not included in the base price isn’t optional in the configurator, but seems necessary as it includes a hitch and trailer harness. At $41,075, my truck is better than the previous-generation Tundra: It can tow more, has standard LED headlights and a larger 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen, while retaining keyless entry and push-button start. Even if the DoubleCab looks a little goofy, the non-hybrid 348-hp twin-turbo V-6 for base models makes more torque sooner than the old truck's beloved 5.7-liter V-8. I think there’s some beauty in that.

Greg Fink's $59,525 Tundra Limited TRD Off-Road

Want the most off-road-ready 2022 Toyota Tundra sans the gasoline-electric hybrid i-Force MAX powertrain? Then pick up a Tundra SR5 or Limited with four-wheel-drive and add on the TRD Off-Road package. (The package is also available on rear-drive Tundra SR5 and Limited trucks, but what sort of jabroni adds an “off-road” pack to a two-wheel-drive truck?) But I’m not stopping there. I’m adding a variety of additional options to my brown (or Smoked Mesquite in Toyota parlance) Tundra crew cab—err. . .CrewMax—with the shorter 5.5-foot box. Heated, leather-wrapped steering wheel? Check. Panoramic sunroof? You know it. While I’m at it, I’ll also tick the boxes for the Limited Premium package (premium LED headlights and additional trailering tech to make the most of this specific truck’s 11,120-pound max towing capacity) and Limited Power package (wireless charging, an AC power socket for rear-seat riders, as well as a second AC power socket mounted in the LED-lit bed. All in, my Tundra Limited rings in at $59,525. It’s certainly not cheap, but it’s arguably the best way to snag a luxury-lined and off-road-ready variant of the strictly gas-powered Tundra.

Eric Stafford's $58,360 Tundra Limited TRD Off-Road

It felt like the Tundra's outgoing generation predated the internet, which makes mixing and matching the all-new 2022 model's trims and options on Toyota's online configurator so refreshing. Since the TRD Pro with its lifted suspension and desirable Fox dampers isn't available yet, I settled for the TRD Off-Road package like several of my colleagues. It's only offered on the SR5 and Limited, and I'd pick the latter because it brings standard features including a 14.0-inch touchscreen as well as leather seats with heating and cooling. While SR5 models offer some of those upgrades, they can't be paired with the TRD Off-Road kit. My Limited would have four-wheel drive, the larger CrewMax cab, and the longer 6.5-foot box. This configuration starts at $53,925. I really dig this truck with Army Green paint, and the $4435 TRD Off-Road package brings light-colored interior upholstery and a panoramic sunroof. The 2022 Tundra Limited's 389-hp twin-turbo V-6 lacks the sound of its predecessor's V-8, but at least Toyota's full-size pickup now—finally—feels up to date.

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