New cars in 2023 we most want to drive



The automotive world started to look a bit more normal this year as returning auto shows and smaller, automaker-run events combined to pull the covers off the new cars coming for 2023 (and beyond). Since the cars we got to see in photos and on static show stands this year will become the ones we actually get to drive next year, our editors sat down to ponder which we're most looking forward to testing. We didn't do this list last year (we honestly don't remember why), but back in the waning days of 2021, we put together a list of cars and SUVs that turned out to be just as good, or at least intriguing, as we had hoped. There were names like Bronco, Defender, BRZ, Mach-E and Wagoneer. We jumped the gun on the Nissan Z a bit (that arrived this year), and I personally picked the Rivian R1S, which I'm still waiting to drive. As you'll see, I apparently did not learn my lesson about choosing unobtanium for this list. - Senior Editor James Riswick

2024 Cadillac Celestiq
2024 Cadillac Celestiq

Cadillac Celestiq

Senior Editor, Green, John Beltz Snyder: I saw an early show car version of the Celestiq at the beginning of the pandemic, and it was stunning. Then I drove the Lyriq, and saw what a fine EV Cadillac could make for a fraction of the price. Just imagine what it can do with a $300,000 car. My only fear is that, with such a rarified vehicle, I might not actually get the chance to drive it. Fingers crossed.

 

2023 Porsche 911 Dakar

Senior Editor James Riswick: This is another potential bittersweet choice, cause I'm pretty sure there's little chance I'll ever be able to drive a 911 Dakar. Neither will my fellow editors below. With only 1,500 set to be built, period, and the press launch set to include only a handful lucky journalists, we'll be living just as vicariously as you are through the report filed here on Autoblog by freelance journalist and former Autoblog editor Steven J. Ewing. He's a nice guy. But he's also a jerk for getting to drive that car in Morocco, or anywhere, instead of me. Yeah, I'm bitter. I'm going to be really persnickety editing that story. He'd better not put a semi-colon in the wrong place. Anywho, the 911 Dakar that I won't be able to drive. It's damned amazing, turning what should be an utterly ridiculous, cynical, cash-grab exercise of "off-road 911, chuckle chuckle" into something that looks like one of the most insanely capable and fun cars on the road. Or off it. That Porsche is only making 1,500 seems like sheer lunacy. Nevertheless, I like to think of myself as an optimist, so here's hoping I'm wrong and I do get to drive a Dakar.

Associate Editor Byron Hurd: Well, Riswick beat me to my first choice and for pretty much the exact same reasons. The best part of this gig is getting precious moments of seat time in cars that will inevitably be sold in limited numbers and locked away, rather than driven. I missed out on the Demon; I'd hate to say the same about this.

 

2024 Ford Mustang

Associate Editor Byron Hurd: I owned a 2015 Mustang GT for a couple years and absolutely loved it. It was the first example of Ford's iconic pony car that truly spoke to me as a driver, not to mention the first one I could sit in comfortably; it took far too long to get a telescoping steering column in that car. I have high hopes for any relatively affordable sporty cars still lingering in the market, and the '24 Mustang has quite the reputation to uphold besides. This may be the last internal-combustion Mustang we ever see, so here's hoping Ford gets it right.

 

2024 Volkswagen ID. Buzz

Senior Editor, Consumer, Jeremy Korzeniewski: It's possible I'm getting a bit ahead of myself here by choosing Volkswagen's upcoming electric van as my pick. VeeDub says customer deliveries in the U.S. won't start until the first part of 2024, but that doesn't mean I won't have an opportunity to drive the thing during the '23 calendar year. Heck, some of my colleagues have already been behind the wheel, albeit in European-spec models. In any case, I'm super stoked about this one. Some of my fondest memories with my wife and pups happened on long road/camping trips in my own vintage VW van. I expect we'd make plenty of new memories if an appropriately equipped Buzz found its way into my life. Being able to keep up with traffic doesn't sound too bad, either, and a recharging stop every 250 miles or so sounds just fine and dandy to me while I'm on a leisurely vacation with my family. The journey is part of the fun!

 

2024 Acura Integra Type S

Road Test Editor Zac Palmer: The new Honda Civic Type R might’ve stolen the show this year, but next year, the Acura Integra Type S gets to take center stage. In all the ways that matter, it looks like the Type S is going to be a luxurious Civic Type R. That means it’ll have most of the performance, but add daily driving niceties like heated seats, a heated steering wheel and most likely numerous other features that aren’t available in the more basic Type R. Sign me up!

With one Integra in the garage already — a 2001 Integra GS-R — I’m already personally interested in the revival of the Integra name. I liked driving the A-Sped a lot earlier this year, but it wasn’t the hardcore hot hatch that I’d want in the driveway. Hopefully, this Type S is, because if so, my checkbook may be opening up. The launch is scheduled for summer of 2023, and my expectations are high, so let’s hope Acura does this one right.

 

2024 Chevy Corvette E-Ray

News Editor Joel Stocksdale: The regular C8 Corvette is one of my absolute favorite cars I've driven. And while I also want to drive the new Z06 next year, I'm actually much more excited for the E-Ray. I'm really fascinated by how the hybrid components will be implemented, and I think they might make a car I already adore even better. More efficiency and traction, but still maintaining that sweet V8 and mid-engine chassis? I think I could only like it more if it was a plug-in and had EV range. At least, I'm assuming. Chevy, please loan me the keys for a week this coming year!