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What's the Best Home EV Charger for 2024? We Tested 7; Here Are the Ones to Buy

best home ev chargers
Best Home EV Chargers for 2024, TestedAmazon


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This article was updated in July 2024 with new products and information. We plan to update this article regularly; check back often for updates.


EV ownership is a big change for drivers accustomed to internal combustion engines. From regenerative braking to single-speed transmissions to charging, owning an electric vehicle comes with a new set of features and responsibilities. The most important of these is EV charging.

Much like plugging in your phone before going to bed, most of your charging is likely to happen at home. Home EV charging is much cheaper and more sustainable than DC fast-charging, and is the logical choice for anyone with access to the right power source.

Key Takeaways:

  • The ChargePoint Home Flex EV Charger is our Best Overall Home EV Charger. The excellent ChargePoint app features a user-friendly interface and pinpoints your cost to the penny.

  • Our Best Budget Home EV Charger is the Emporia. Despite its affordable price, it doesn't sacrifice features.

  • Another great option is Tesla's Universal Wall Connector. It has a built-in adapter so you can switch between J1772 and NACS/J3400 plug types easily.

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After thorough testing, the Gear Team picked seven of the best EV home chargers ranging in price from $300 to $700. These universal level 1 and 2 chargers will work with any EV on the market today. Some boast features like Wi-Fi connectivity, allowing users to monitor charging and control the unit via an app, while others are rugged, no-frills chargers made to last inside and out. Some chargers listed offer variants with slightly different prices.

More Tech: Best EV Charging Accessories | Best Road Trip Gadgets | Best Apple CarPlay Adapters


Home EV Charging Basics

Before you run out and buy the cheapest EV charger you can find and install it in your garage, there are some facts you should know.

EV Charging Levels:

  • Level 1: Using 120-volt AC electricity (i.e., a standard household outlet) with an output of roughly 1 kilowatt, one of these devices could take days to charge your EV

  • Level 2: Uses 240-volt AC electricity to charge with outputs generally between 6 and 19 kilowatts. Should charge an EV with a modestly sized battery overnight

  • Level 3/DC Fast-Charger: Many public chargers are this type, but they're illogical for home use due to their high cost. But just so you know, these chargers use 400- or 800-volt DC electricity to charge with output ranging from 50 to 350 kilowatts, charging a typical EV's battery from 10 to 90 percent in as little as 30 minutes

Things to Consider When Buying an EV Charger

Before you buy a home EV charger, there are a ton of factors to consider. Will it work with not only your current EV, but will it adapt to any future EVs you may purchase? How much will an EV charger affect your home electricity bill? And most importantly, can your home's electrical system handle the workload? Here's what to think about before buying a home EV charger.

Output

This is how much charging power is being sent from your wall charger to your electric vehicle, measured in kilowatts. The voltage of the electrical circuit multiplied by the number of amps of current flowing equals the power in watts; 1000 watts equals a kilowatt, so a 240-volt outlet drawing 32 amps of current is putting out 7.7 kW of power.

Household Circuit Output

We highly recommend consulting an electrician and, depending on your confidence in your ability to measure your house's electrical circuit, you may want to take this step first because you will need a certified electrician to verify your home's circuit capacity and install any necessary equipment upgrades.

To charge most EVs overnight while keeping costs down, we recommend at least a modest 40- or 50-amp circuit. To see the maximum your home can handle before blowing its main breaker, check the main fuse in your breaker box for its amperage rating. If you have 150- or 200-amp service or higher, you may have enough wiggle room to add an EV charger without an upgrade. But again—it's always wise to ask an expert.

Charge Rate

The charge rate is crucial to estimating how long it will take your EV to charge. Your charge rate will be affected by three factors: the output of your household circuit, your charging equipment, and your electric vehicle's onboard charger.

Charge rate is expressed in kilowatts—volts times amps equals watts, and 1000 watts equals a kilowatt. So if you're charging at 6 kilowatts and your EV has a 60.0-kWh battery, the charge time from empty to full will be roughly 10 hours, if not longer due to losses during charging and slowing down of the charge rate as the battery nears 100 percent.

Connector Types

The home EV you ultimately purchase will have a connector that plugs into your car, and you've got to choose the right one for your EV. There are two main types: J1772 and Tesla's North American Charging Standard (aka NACS or J3400), which is becoming ever-more prevalent in the EV industry. Adapters that let you switch between these connectors are widely available, allowing you to use your charger for different types of EVs.

Cost to Install

This depends on whether you have enough spare electrical capacity in your home circuit or you need to hire an electrician to upgrade your system. If your circuit has enough capacity, you might be able to run a new electrical line for a few hundred dollars. If not, upgrading your home's electrical system can cost a few thousand bucks.

Wi-Fi Connectivity

If you wish to keep track of your EV's electrical use and cost, you'll want a home-charging unit with Wi-Fi connectivity. This allows you to monitor charging, receive alerts, and control the unit remotely via an app.

Accessories and Variants

Most EV chargers offer different variants to suit your needs. These variants (hard-wired or plug, different output capabilities, varying cord lengths, etc.) are typically sold at slightly different prices. Make sure you look at all the various options from any manufacturer you're considering to make sure it suits your needs.

Outdoor Ratings

If you want your EV charger mounted outside, it's doable. Each charging unit we tested below has an outdoor-grade rating according to either the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) or Ingress Protection (IP) standards. There's additional information below on deciphering these ratings below in our FAQs section.

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Electric vehicle technology is constantly and rapidly changing. We'll be updating this roundup regularly, so check back often. Based on extensive testing and evaluation by the Gear Team, here are our picks for the best home chargers for electric cars you can buy today.

The Best Home EV Chargers, Tested

BEST OVERALL: ChargePoint Home Flex EV Charger

  • Output capability: 50/48/40/32/24/16 amps (12.0/11.5/9.6/7.7/5.8/3.8 kW)

  • Cord length: 23 feet

  • Cord management: Built-in

  • Outdoor rating: Yes (NEMA 3R)

ChargePoint's Home Flex unit integrates into the same app used to connect to the company's numerous public charging units. The Gear Team found the app to be the most user-friendly of all the ones they tested, with the clearest display and easiest-to-understand charts. Total charge time and energy output during each charge are also easy to read, comprehend, and schedule.

The ChargePoint app also offers the most in-depth cost-tracking, allowing users to select a rate plan from their local utility company. The Gear Team was able to calculate the actual cost of charging down to the penny, even when charging on a variable rate. They also appreciated the built-in notch at the top of the unit to wrap the cord around; many other units require the purchase of a second cord-management device.

<p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WXZDHGV?tag=syn-yahoo-20&ascsubtag=%5Bartid%7C2160.g.37937256%5Bsrc%7Cyahoo-us" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shop Now;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" class="link ">Shop Now</a></p><p>BEST OVERALL: ChargePoint Home Flex EV Charger</p><p>amazon.com</p><p>$599.00</p><span class="copyright">Amazon</span>

BEST BUDGET: Emporia EV Charger

  • Output capability: 48–6 amps (11.5–1.4 kW)

  • Cord length: 24 feet

  • Cord management: Included wall mount

  • Outdoor rating: Yes (NEMA 4)

This is an impressive WiFi-connected entry at an attractive price point. The 11.5-kW output capability is at the high end of the chargers tested. The Emporia has just about everything a consumer could want, including detailed electricity pricing using your actual utility plan.

Emporia's entire electricity-tracking universe is integrated into Emporia's app. However, the Gear Team found that navigating around all of these areas of the app is overly confuscating if you're just charging your EV.

<p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09ZNN3JB7?tag=syn-yahoo-20&ascsubtag=%5Bartid%7C2160.g.37937256%5Bsrc%7Cyahoo-us" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shop Now;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" class="link ">Shop Now</a></p><p>BEST BUDGET: Emporia EV Charger</p><p>amazon.com</p><p>$399.00</p><span class="copyright">Amazon</span>

BEST FOR TESLAs: Tesla J1772 Wall Connector

  • Output capability: 48/40/32/24/16/12 amps (11.5/9.6/7.7/5.8/3.8/2.9 kW)

  • Cord length: 24 feet

  • Cord management: Built-in

  • Outdoor rating: Yes (NEMA 3R)

Don't own a Tesla? The company's Wall Connector is still a great EV charging option for your home. In addition to its rapidly-endorsed NACS plug, Tesla also offers its home charging unit with the J1772 plug that most other EVs currently use. Connecting to a non-Tesla EV simply requires an adapter. The Wall Connector's sleek shape and glass-like clear top layer make it the most visually appealing charger tested.

The setup process for the Wall Connector is simple; just scan the QR code on the side of the unit to connect to WiFi, then set the output limit through a web-based interface.

Although the Wall Connector is capable of almost the highest output of the devices tested by the Gear Team, (48 amps or 11.5 kilowatts), it also has the thinnest cables. They're easy to wrangle, but will the small diameter affect long-term durability?

<p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BWSKSTG6?tag=syn-yahoo-20&ascsubtag=%5Bartid%7C2160.g.37937256%5Bsrc%7Cyahoo-us" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shop Now;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" class="link ">Shop Now</a></p><p>BEST FOR TESLAs: Tesla J1772 Wall Connector</p><p>amazon.com</p><p>$899.96</p><span class="copyright">Amazon</span>

GREAT OPTION: JuiceBox 40 Smart EV Charging Station

  • Output capability: 40/32/24/16/12/6 amps (9.6/7.7/5.8/3.8/2.9/1.4 kW)

  • Cord length: 25 feet

  • Cord management: Built-in

  • Outdoor rating: Yes (NEMA 4X/IP66)

When Car and Driver first tested home EV charging units in 2022, the Gear Team preferred the JuiceBox charger to all the rest. Since then, the company has redesigned its app—and it's somehow less intuitive now? Nevertheless, the JuiceBox is still one of the most feature-rich Wi-Fi-enabled Level 2 chargers you can buy, and deserves a spot on this list.

The JuiceBox comes in three output levels. In addition to the 40-amp version tested, there's a 48-amp version that's at the high end of the price spectrum for this group, and a 32-amp version that costs less.

The JuiceBox provides energy output and charge time for each session, customizable push notifications, and the ability to set charge times to take advantage of variable utility rates.

<p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07ZL41687?tag=syn-yahoo-20&ascsubtag=%5Bartid%7C2160.g.37937256%5Bsrc%7Cyahoo-us" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shop Now;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" class="link ">Shop Now</a></p><p>GREAT OPTION: JuiceBox 40 Smart EV Charging Station</p><p>amazon.com</p><p>$599.00</p><span class="copyright">Amazon</span>

BEST PORTABLE: Lectron 32 Amp EV Charger

  • Output capability: 32/16/13/10 amps (7.7/3.8/3.1/2.4 kW)

  • Cord length: 21 feet

  • Cord management: none

  • Outdoor rating: Yes (IP67)

This Lectron is one of the least expensive home EV charger options on the market. Even though it isn't a "smart" unit with Wi-Fi capability and 32 amps is at the low end of the charging spectrum, it has a small LCD screen that displays voltage, amperage, charge time, energy (kWh), and temperature. There's no wall mount for the cord, but a simple hook or hose reel should suffice.

This unit lets you set the limit on current output, which can be adjusted among 10, 13, 16, or 32 amps to match your wall circuit. When you plug in, charge time starts over, but the kilowatt-hour readout doesn't. Further, there's no app monitoring charging, so if you want to track your car's efficiency you have to unplug and replug it before every charge. If you want to track your charging fastidiously, one of the Wi-Fi-connected units on our list is probably a better choice.

<p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HKLCXPJ?tag=syn-yahoo-20&ascsubtag=%5Bartid%7C2160.g.37937256%5Bsrc%7Cyahoo-us" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shop Now;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" class="link ">Shop Now</a></p><p>BEST PORTABLE: Lectron 32 Amp EV Charger</p><p>amazon.com</p><p>$237.99</p><span class="copyright">Amazon</span>

BEST BUDGET SMART EV CHARGER: Grizzl-E Smart EV Charger

  • Output capability: 40/32/24/16 amps (9.6/7.7/5.8/3.8 kW)

  • Cord length: 24 feet

  • Cord management: Included wall mount

  • Outdoor rating: Yes (NEMA 4X/IP67)

The Grizzl-E Smart is one of the cheapest smart EV charging units on the market. Grizzl-E touts the ruggedness of its beefy aluminum enclosure. Videos on its website show a small off-road vehicle running over it (which seems completely unnecessary for a thing that's mounted on a wall, but hey: image is everything). It also had the thickest cables, which were consequently the most resistant to hanging up after charging. A wall mount for the cable is included.

It can (theoretically) pair with any EV charging app that uses the OCPP (Open Charge Point Protocol) 1.6. However, connection to an app was a pain. After quite a bit of back-and-forth, the Gear Team was eventually able to get a firmware update and connect this unit to the ChargeLab app. Grizzl-E claims to have streamlined the process, but still: buyer beware.

Like the other units, this one can adjust among various output levels, but that's most difficult to accomplish in the Grizzl-E. Rather than change it via the app, you have to take off the front cover and toggle DIP switches. The unit can, however, be preordered to a specific setting to save that hassle. The cover also must be removed to reset the Wi-Fi connection, which we did at least a half-dozen times when trying to get ours to connect.

<p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0CB9LLV4H?tag=syn-yahoo-20&ascsubtag=%5Bartid%7C2160.g.37937256%5Bsrc%7Cyahoo-us" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shop Now;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" class="link ">Shop Now</a></p><p>BEST BUDGET SMART EV CHARGER: Grizzl-E Smart EV Charger</p><p>amazon.com</p><p>$280.00</p><span class="copyright">Amazon</span>

How We Tested EV Chargers

To find the best home EV chargers on the market, the Gear Team went down the same path a new EV owner would, starting with installing a dedicated 240-volt outlet in the garage. We also hooked up a 40-amp circuit to the existing electric service without a pricey upgrade to run additional capacity. To be able to easily switch among the units, we ordered a NEMA 14-50 plug-in variant of each charging device.

We built this inline meter to verify how much energy is delivered to the vehicle. Photo: Michael Simari
We built this inline meter to verify how much energy is delivered to the vehicle. Photo: Michael Simari


We used each charger on a Tesla Model 3 numerous times over a period of months. We then compared the electricity output from the wall to what the Model 3 reported made it into its battery pack, using the (very cool) TeslaFi software.

For this update, the Gear Team tested a few new units along with our favorites from our previous test on a Rivian R1T, verifying the energy delivered to the vehicle with an inline electrical meter. Despite varying cord lengths and thicknesses, there was no measurable difference in performance or efficiency.

charging of an electric car
Westend61 - Getty Images

Home EV Charging FAQs

What are the different types of EV chargers?

Not all home EV chargers are the same. Charging capability is categorized into three tiers, starting with Level 1 using 120-volt AC electricity. Level 2 charging uses 240-volt AC electricity. AC electricity is what your house is wired for, therefore Level 1 and 2 charging doesn’t require any special fitment to your home.

Level 3 charging, also known as DC fast-charging, is high-voltage (400 to 800 volts) charging that produces a much quicker rate of charge and is typically only available at public EV charging stations. DC fast-chargers are generally incompatible with home wiring and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to install.

What’s the difference between Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 charging?

The phrase “levels” generally refers to the rate at which each style of chargers. Level 1 is rudimentary and extremely slow, meaning it could take days to produce a full charge. Level 2 is the sweet spot for daily EV drivers, given that level 2 charging is attuned for at-home use and usually provides a full charge overnight. Level 3 is the fastest.

To be specific, the levels designate the voltage that is input into the EV. Level 1 means 120 volts, like a typical household outlet, with a typical charging rate of 1.4 kilowatts. Level 2 is 240 volts (think electric clothes dryer) and, depending on the amperage of the circuit, can range between 5.8 and 19.2 kW. Level 3 is DC fast-charging, operating between 400 or 800 volts, and the rates can be as high as 350 kW.

Are all home electric vehicle chargers the same?

Well, sort of. Technically, EV chargers are electric vehicle supply equipment, providing power to the charger inside the electric vehicle. A charger’s main function is to funnel the electricity in your house to your car, which makes the main function of each charger identical.

Differences arise in their output capability, expressed in either amps (e.g., 32, 40, 48 amps) or power (e.g., 7.7, 9.6, 11.5 kW). Higher output chargers allow for increased charging speed, while lower output chargers take more time.

Wi-Fi connectivity is another big difference. Typically, Wi-Fi-enabled chargers allow charging to be monitored and controlled remotely, hence the name smart chargers.

Smart chargers can make a significant difference in cost analysis, due to the extensive data they produce. Of course, smart chargers are a luxury in the world of EV chargers; a non-smart charger will charge your EV just the same. However, it’s hard for us not to recommend a smart charger because of its ease of use and cost-tracking potential.

How do I choose the right charger?

Here are some of the major considerations that should go into every EV home charger purchase:

CABLE MANAGEMENT AND LENGTH

It may seem silly, but having a convenient place to store your charge cable when not in use is a nice feature, and one that many chargers lack. Of course you can always stick a hook in the wall should your charger of choice lack this option.

What's harder to work around is the length of the charging cord, which varies dramatically between manufacturers. Depending on where you park and the overall cleanliness of your garage, a long cord (or an aftermarket extension cord) might be necessary.

Furthermore, thick cords aren't as flexible as their skinnier counterparts, but they are more likely to stand up to some abuse. Keep all of these factors in mind while you shop

SIZE

Depending on how much space you have available in your garage or outside your home, certain EV home chargers just might not fit your needs. A bulkier unit could eat up useful garage space, whereas a thinner unit would not. Measure the space in which you'd like to place the charger, and make sure the unit you intend to purchase will fit!

WEATHERPROOF

If you're limited on garage space, you may opt to install an outdoor EV charger. While there are a ton of weatherproof units available for purchase (including every unit you see here), double-check the owner's manual to ensure everything is up to par. Water and electricity is not a fun combination.

HARDWIRE VS PLUG-IN

Once you've got a space set aside for your home EV charger, you'll need to decide whether you want a hardwired or plug-in unit. Plug-in units have gotten far more popular as more EVs hit the market, as owners can simply unplug the unit and bring them along on trips or a full-blown move. That said, a hardwired unit will still provide the same level of charging performance, albeit locked into one place.

Do I need to buy my own EV charging equipment?

Not necessarily. While you do need a device to connect the electricity from your house to your vehicle, you may be able to get by with the portable charging equipment that came with your vehicle. In some cases, the car either comes with or the automaker sells accessory adapters that allow the portable unit to plug into a 240-volt circuit and provide perfectly acceptable charging speeds, as long as you don't mind leaving it behind in your garage (or regularly loading it in and out of your car).

How do I wire my house to charge an EV, and how much does it cost?

The answer to this question is largely dependent on the home that you are currently living in. If you have enough electrical capacity on your property, an installation can be as low as a few hundred dollars, as you'll just need an additional dedicated electrical line.

This runs from your breaker right to the charger and ensures you have the consistent output required to charge the vehicle. You're also going to need a 40- or 50-amp circuit installed if you don't have one nearby. A NEMA 14-50 outlet works great and allows you to unplug your charger if needed. You can also run heavy power tools on that outlet, should you have a project car in the garage as well. Qmerit is a company that provides these installation services nationwide and is a great resource for new EV owners.

If you don't currently have enough electricity available on your property, the cost of installing a charger gets significantly more expensive. We're talking at least a few thousand dollars worth of work in order to bring you the extra juice. That's worth keeping in mind before you start tackling an EV charger install on your own.

Are there tax breaks for electric car owners who buy a home charger?

Yes. The Inflation Reduction Act reinstated a federal tax credit of 30 percent of your total costs (capped at $1000). That includes money spent on electrical upgrades and wiring to your house, in addition to the charging unit itself. This credit is currently set to be in place through 2032. In addition, there are often additional state or regional incentives, so make sure to check what's available in your area.

Which plug type should I choose for my charging equipment?

Although several automakers have announced a switch from a J1772 connector to Tesla's North America Charging Standard (NACS) design in the 2025 time frame, whether you buy a J1772 or NACS unit today doesn't limit its future compatibility. There are adapters to go from NACS to J1772 or vice versa, and with the mixed ports both on the vehicles and the public-charging infrastructure, EV owners will need to get used to keeping adapters in their vehicles to be prepared for whichever plug type they encounter.

Can charging equipment be mounted outside?

Generally, yes. Each charging unit we tested has an outdoor-grade rating according to either the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) or Ingress Protection (IP) standards. A NEMA 3R rating, like the ChargePoint and Tesla Wall Connector have, is intended for outdoor use, but does not mean watertight; under certain circumstances, moisture could potentially enter the enclosure. The NEMA 4X rating of the JuiceBox 40 and Grizzl-E is superior. The IP ratings are two digits, the first representing the unit's resistance to solids (in this case dust) and the second number representing water protection. An IP66 rating means the unit is intended for outdoor use, with complete protection from dust or high-pressure water. But an IP67 goes one step further and can be immersed in water up to three feet deep.

Another thing to keep in mind with charging equipment mounted outside is that the electrical feed line to that location must also be in an outdoor-rated enclosure and, if you’re using a plug-type unit like they tested, that the outlet's enclosure must also be rated for outdoor use.

What’s the difference between a vehicle’s on-board charger and an EV charger?

Again, the home EV chargers you see here aren’t really chargers but rather suppliers. The electric vehicle supply equipment, or EVSE, provides the vehicle’s onboard charger with AC electricity from your house.

Once the EV’s onboard charger has been provided with AC electricity, it converts it to DC energy to be stored in the battery. Even if the electrical output of your household is greater than that of the vehicle, you won’t be able to exceed the charge rate limited by the onboard charger.

Do I need to buy EV charging equipment?

It depends on your vehicle. Obviously, you need a device to connect the electricity from your house to your vehicle. That said, some EVs come with portable charging equipment that, in some cases, plugs into a 240-volt circuit and provides perfectly acceptable charging speeds. However, using the provided standalone cable and power is a slightly more laborious technique.

Are there tax breaks for electric car owners who buy a home charger?

Yes. The sweeping Inflation Reduction Act reinstated a federal tax credit of 30 percent of your total costs (capped at $1000). That includes money spent on electrical upgrades and wiring to your house, in addition to the charging unit itself. This credit is currently set to be in place through 2032. In addition, there are often additional state or regional incentives, so make sure to check what's available in your area.

How do I wire my house to charge an EV, and how much does it cost?

Having the right circuit is vital; a 40- or 50-amp circuit will be able to charge most EVs overnight. Depending on your setup, charging equipment will either connect via a plug or be hardwired into your home's electricity.

We suggest going with a NEMA 14-50 outlet; that way the charging equipment simply plugs into an outlet, similar to any other household device. Given the price of EV charging equipment, it’s important that owners can easily move and take the equipment with them. Other 240-volt needs can also be fulfilled by the charger, such as an electric heater or heavy power tools.

There’s one other important piece to the EV home charger puzzle: a dedicated electrical line. Starting at your breaker box and fed to the garage or exterior location you want to install the charging equipment, the electrical line will provide the constant power needed to keep the charger running.

Qmerit is a company that specializes in these installs and has a nationwide network of electrical contractors to do the work. The costs associated with this installation will depend on your household’s electrical capacity.

If you have the spare electrical capacity, the process is as easy as installing the new line and paying a few hundred dollars. If you’re lacking in power, you’ll be required to add additional electrical capacity, which can cost thousands of dollars.

Which plug type should I choose for my charging equipment?

Although several automakers have announced a switch from a J1772 connector to Tesla's North America Charging Standard (NACS) design in the 2025 time frame, whether you buy a J1772 or NACS unit today doesn't limit its future compatibility. There are adapters to go from NACS to J1772 or vice versa, and with the mixed ports both on the vehicles and the public-charging infrastructure, EV owners will need to get used to keeping adapters in their vehicles to be prepared for whichever plug type they encounter.

Can charging equipment be mounted outside?

Generally, yes. Each charging unit we tested has an outdoor-grade rating according to either the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) or Ingress Protection (IP) standards. A NEMA 3R rating, like the ChargePoint and Tesla Wall Connector have, is intended for outdoor use, but does not mean watertight; under certain circumstances, moisture could potentially enter the enclosure. The NEMA 4X rating of the JuiceBox 40 and Grizzl-E is superior. The IP ratings are two digits, the first representing the unit's resistance to solids (in this case dust) and the second number representing water protection. An IP66 rating means the unit is intended for outdoor use, with complete protection from dust or high-pressure water. But an IP67 goes one step further and can be immersed in water up to three feet deep.

Another thing to keep in mind with charging equipment mounted outside is that the electrical feed line to that location must also be in an outdoor-rated enclosure and, if you’re using a plug-type unit like we tested, that the outlet's enclosure must also be rated for outdoor use.

Why Trust Us?

Autoweek and its sibling publications at Hearst Autos represent three of the most influential automotive publications in the world. We rely on decades of experience in the automotive and gear spaces to help readers make informed purchasing choices.

With the legacies of Autoweek, Car and Driver, and Road & Track behind us, the Hearst Autos Gear Team is more concerned with our integrity and the trust our readers place in us than our bottom line. We won't tell you to buy something if we wouldn't buy it ourselves or recommend it to our friends, and we'll never claim to have used or tested something if we haven't.

We've evaluated dozens of products, from SIM Racing Setups and Rooftop Cargo Carriers to OBD-II Scanners. Our picks and recommendations of products and gear are based on testing and knowledge, not hype.

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