Best New Car Lease Deals for October 2021

·7 min read
Photo credit: Honda
Photo credit: Honda

You cannot wait. You must have a brand-new car right now, and you're not the pickiest person. You may be that person who tries unlocking the wrong Nissan Rogue in a parking lot, only to realize the junk in the back seat is not your junk. Hey, a car's a car, isn't it? To you, we present: The Leftovers.

Leftovers are the final run of a car's generation before that model gets a complete redesign or is dropped entirely. They've often stuck around too long, like the cream cheese you forgot was in the back of the fridge, and rank at the middle or toward the bottom of their class. Sometimes, though, Leftovers are great cars that have gotten better with age. In either case, they also can be a brand's most reliable offering, as automakers usually take the first few years to sort out kinks and then make improvements over the years that they should have done at the start.

We'll detail both kinds of Leftovers in this month's lease deals. But be warned: When you lease a Leftover, you're committing to three-plus years with an older car, when a brand-new version will be out before your lease is up—likely for around the same money. If you're okay with driving something that soon will be outdated, keep reading.

But first, read our guide to learn if leasing a car is right for you. We've covered everything that may get glossed over in the showroom: advertising fees, money factors, residuals, legal implications, and all the other fine print that could cost you thousands more than you'd expect. We've sorted the vehicles by monthly price, but when comparing similar cars, be aware that a lower monthly price often demands more money up front. As with any national lease special, enter your ZIP code on an automaker's website to check if these deals apply to your area. Prices may be higher or lower depending on the region. Research is always your friend.

Photo credit: Hyundai
Photo credit: Hyundai

2021 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid

$189 per month/$1999 at signing
36 months/30,000 miles

Hyundai is launching an entire series of electric cars under the Ioniq model name, so this first-gen Toyota Prius-fighter is a one-and-done deal. Phenomenal fuel economy is part of that deal, with up to 58 mpg city and a whopping 60 mpg highway with this lease deal's Ioniq Blue trim. Few EVs, dollar for dollar, can match this hybrid's low driving costs over the long run. It helps that the rest of the Ioniq is pretty good too. Just don't be upset when the ultra-slick Ioniq 5, 6, and 7 come out while you're still driving this older one.

Photo credit: Chevrolet
Photo credit: Chevrolet

2021 Chevrolet Trax

$189 per month/$3139 at signing
39 months/32,500 miles

The best thing about the current Chevy Trax is that it's less ugly than the original 2015 model. The Trax is an example of what General Motors does best: Build a bare-bones, cost-cut vehicle that quickly becomes stale and then is dropped. That's the likely fate for the Trax after the 2022 model year—the 2022 version being no different than the 2021 lease special seen here (for the base AWD LT; knock $1000 off the initial payment if you currently lease any 2016 or newer vehicle). The Trax, though, is an also-ran in this class. For a subcompact crossover with more appeal, see the Chevy Trailblazer.

Photo credit: Acura
Photo credit: Acura

2022 Acura ILX

$289 per month/$3099 at signing
36 months/30,000 miles

The Acura ILX is a Honda Civic in a shinier wrapper, but not the current Honda Civic. This ILX came out several Civics ago, back in 2013. The ILX was a fun proposition when there was a manual transmission, but that's long gone. Now it just seems old, particularly the interior. It's telling that Honda has redesigned the Civic twice in this car's lifetime (the new 2022 model wipes the floor with the ILX), while Acura bothered only to refresh the exterior in 2019 and add some additional safety features. This is a nearly 10-year-old new car, but ultimately it's a 10-year-old Honda, so it's cheap to run. The ILX will depart next year when Acura reintroduces the Integra.

Photo credit: Honda
Photo credit: Honda

2022 Honda CR-V

$289 per month/$3799 at signing
36 months/30,000 miles

One of the bestselling and most compelling compact SUVs on the market, the CR-V has dominated the segment for decades. The formula still works: a spacious interior, Honda reliability, and decent equipment for the money. Some competitors are sportier or prettier, but the CR-V trades on traditional Honda values of economy and quality. An all-new CR-V is coming for 2023, but if you like the deal on this AWD EX and don't care about the new car's blockier styling and (presumably) plusher interior, go ahead and grab it.

Photo credit: Mazda
Photo credit: Mazda

2021 Mazda 6

$351 per month/$2538 at signing
36 months/30,000 miles

The Mazda 6 is taking a break for 2022 and may not return. A sedan this pretty should reconsider leaving the party so soon, although it's rumored to return with a new rear-wheel-drive chassis and an inline-six. Meanwhile, the outgoing 6, though dating back to this generation's 2014 debut, is still one of our favorite mid-size sedans to drive, and it makes our boring errands enjoyable. Mazda sweats the small stuff such as steering feel and paint quality and manages to make an older car feel almost as fresh as newer competitors from Toyota, Honda, and Hyundai. This lease is for the well-equipped Touring, which includes heated front seats, a sunroof, and the larger 19-inch wheels.

Photo credit: Fiat
Photo credit: Fiat

2021 Fiat 500X

$372 per month/$3949 at signing
42 months/35,000 miles

Fiat is on life support in the United States with just one car left: the humble 500X. Based on the Jeep Renegade, the 500X is a decent small crossover that's unique only for the sad fact that no one buys Fiats in the U.S. After a decade since the Italian brand returned to the U.S. market, the cute 500 clicked with tiny-car buyers for a minute and has since gone belly up. The 500L was a dud from the beginning, while the Mazda-built Fiat 124 Spider never resonated with Miata buyers who, understandably, kept buying Miatas. Lease this 500X Trekking for three-and-a-half years and you'll likely have the very last Fiat standing.

Photo credit: Ford
Photo credit: Ford

2022 Ford Edge

$412 per month/$4027 at signing
39 months/34,125 miles

The Edge sells because it hits all the essentials of a mid-size two-row SUV. But this Ford is only middling now that this generation is seven years old—the larger, newer Explorer sells for similar prices. As with any car, the age really shows in the interior: small screens, old buttons, and a basic layout. Even the twin-turbo ST is not a terrific performer for its $50,000-plus asking price. There are better choices in this segment, but if automotive continuity brings you calm, consider the Edge your all-wheel-drive spa appointment.

Photo credit: BMW
Photo credit: BMW

2021 BMW M2

$819 per month/$4999 at signing
36 months/30,000 miles

A relative steal considering how dealers once marked up this stubby, overpowered little car, the M2 is peak BMW. In other words, it's an old car at heart, with a fiery inline-six, rear-wheel drive, a delightful manual transmission, and an all-business interior. The M2 Competition—a value-packed upgrade that replaced the original M2 for 2019—is the only choice before BMW brings a new M2 within the next year. The ride is rough, the tech is several versions behind the latest BMWs, and the styling won't get you noticed outside the BMW fanbase. But among the aging cars we'd keep driving forever, the M2 is one of the all-time greats.

You Might Also Like

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting